AHSEC 2nd Year English Question Answer- Magh Bihu or Maghar Domahi By Praphulladutta Goswami, Important Answers.

AHSEC H.S 2nd Year English Solution. We have prepared important answers of lesson “Magh Bihu or Maghar Domahi”  by Praphulladutta Goswami from the core text Vistas.

 

Magh Bihu or Maghar Domahi
   Praphulladutta Goswami
1. Magh Bihu is the foremost festival of which state of India?
Ans: Assam is the foremost festival of which state of India.
2. Magh Bihu is celebrated in which month?
Ans: Magh Bihu is celebrated in January.
3. What does the term Domahi mean?
Ans: Domahi means the junction of two months.
4. The fire ceremony is closely associated with which Bihu?
Ans: Fire ceremony is closely associated with Magh Bihu.
5. What is the other name of Magh Bihu?
Ans: The other name of Magh Bihu is Bhogali Bihu.
6. Magh Bihu has stronger hold on people in which part of Assam?
Ans: Magh Bihu has stronger hold on the people of lower Assam.
7. What is the night before Magh Bihu is called?
Ans: The night before Magh Bihu is called Uruka.
8. What does the temple shaped structures call?
Ans: The temple shaped structures are called Mejis.
9. What does the hut like structure called?
Ans: The hut like structures are called Bhelaghar.
10. What does the name kongali means?
Ans: The name kongali means poor indicating that barns are empty and there is limited availability of food.
2 Marks Question Answer:
1. What does Magh Bihu marks?
Ans: Magh Bihu or Bhgali Bihu is a harvest festival of Assam, it marks the end of the harvesting season. Magh bihu is observed n the first day of Magh month.
2. Which state celebrates the festival Uruka?
Ans: Uruka festival is celebrated in Assam. It is celebrated on January 13th every year at the night before Magh Bihu. This festival is dedicated to Lord Agni.
3. What are Mejis are made up of?
Ans: Mejis are made of hay, dry grass and leaves which is lit up by the eldest member f the family. Various kinds of food items like coconut and betel nut are offered to meji before it is set on fire.
4. What type of games are observed during Magh Bihu?
Ans: Indigenous games such as wrestling, racing, jumping, buffalo fighting, Egg fighting are the parts of the celebrations, Community fishing by the tribes in the large wetlands can be also seen. Earlier times martial games, like swordplay and javelin throwing were also customary.
5. What are the various foods prepare in Magh Bihu?
Ans: Bhogali Bihu means various food items like chira, pitha, laru, curd etc. The lunch taken on this day is not rice and curry but chira, pitha and so on. Special preparations are mah-karai, takeli pitha, sunga pitha, sunga saul, borarice, fried Pithas. Tribals indulge in brewing rice bear.
Long Question Answer:
 
1.    The Uruka happens to be an important aspect of Magh Bihu. Give an elaborate account of the celebrations associated with Uruka.
Ans: Magh Bihu is one of the most important community festivals in Assam. It is the harvest festival celebrated by the Assamese people in the local month of Magh during mid-January. Magh Bihu is also called as Bhogali Bihu as it is celebrated with community feasts after the annual harvest. The highlight of this festival is the food due to the abundance of grains after the harvest. The night before Magh Bihu is called Uruka, it is the night of feasts. Villagers make a bamboo huts called Bhelaghor, or community kitchen and begin the preparations. Various dishes, vegetables, meat items and sweets such as Pitha, Laru, mah-karai, takeli pitha, sunga pitha, sunga saul, borarice, fried Pithas are made out of sesame, molasses and coconut are prepared. The next morning, the community gathers to light the Meji, a large bonfire and pray for a better harvest in the year ahead. Offerings are made to the sacred fire and people later indulge in traditional Jolpan breakfast. Indigenous games such as wrestling, racing, jumping, buffalo fighting, Egg fighting are the parts of the celebrations. Community fishing by the tribes in the large wetlands can be also seen. Earlier times martial games, like swordplay and javelin throwing were also customary.  The Bhelaghor huts are burnt at the end of the festival. The festival also marks Makar Sankranti, or the transit of the sun towards the Tropic of Cancer. Many other communities across India also celebrate the same occasion as it marks the end of winter and the beginning of longer days.
 
2.   What is the importance of Kati Bihu?
Ans: KongaliBihu is also called Kati Bihu. It is usually celebrated midway in October and the celebration is quiet when compared with the other two Bihu festivals. It is observed on the first calendar day of ‘Kati’ month in the Assamese calendar. The name “kogali” means poor indicating barns are empty and there is limited availability of food. At this time of the year, paddy grows in field and farmers pray to God for a good harvest. Goddess Laxmi is known to bring prosperity at home and she is worshipped by women particularly. Diyas, candles or lamps are lighted in the evening and placed at various places including paddy fields. A lamp is also lit in front of the Tulsi plant which is considered symbolic of Vrinda, one of the devotees of Krishna. The lamps lit in paddy fields are kept high on bamboos so that insects fall prey to these lamps keeping the crops healthy. Lighting lamps on high bamboos also have the superstition belief that states – showing the path of heaven to the spirits of ancestors who have come to give their blessings. These lamps on bamboo are referred to as “Akash-banti” in Assamese.
            There are enthusiasm and vigour is Bihu celebration but the Kati Bihu significance lies in offering prayers to God for a good harvest. This is the only Bihu where cultivators think about practical reality. They are concerned about the rice sapling harvest since a good harvest will bring prosperity to the home. Kati Bihu has typically more religious values as it entirely revolves offering prayers in various forms.
 
3.   What is the significance of Magh Bihu?
Ans: There are three different kinds of Bihu celebrated in the north-eastern state of Assam, but as a fresh, new year has arrived and it is the month of January, so I decided to focus on’ Magh Bihu’ which is the last of the three Bihu celebrated in Assam. Magh Bihu is celebrated every year in the month of January in the north-eastern state of Assam. It is also known as ’Bhogali Bihu’ and ‘Maghar Domahi.’  The term ‘bhog’ means food which signifies the abundance of crops as during this festival people enjoy various dishes together. The festival which is called Bihu in Assam is also celebrated in other parts of India and is known by different names such as Makar Sankranti, Pongal and Lohri. Magh Bihu or Bhogali Bihu has rich historical significance. As we all know, the primary occupation in India is farming. People mostly rely on agriculture for a living. Thus, Assam celebrates this festival during the time of harvest as it marks the end of the harvest season in Assam. There is a feeling of happiness and contentment in the air around this time. The farmers feel a great sigh of relief after the tremendous hard work and this festival is the time to taste the fruit of their hard work. It brings wealth, prosperity and ultimate tranquillity to the farmers as they sell their harvest. They feel financially or economically upgraded as the seeds of their hard work soon, begin to ripe. In the ‘uruka night’, people get together and make arrangements outside their houses, cook delicious food and enjoy together. People enjoy an entire night by singing Bihu songs and tapping their feet to the rhythm of ‘dhol ‘ which is a traditional musical instrument. They also play different kinds of games and exchange sweets and other gifts among each other. These activities take place under a small cottage; known as ‘bhelghor’, build especially for this occasion. Bhogali Bihu means various food items like  chira, pitha, laru, curd etc. The lunch taken on this day is not rice and curry but chira, pitha and s on. Special preparations are mah-karai, takeli pitha, sunga pitha, sunga saul, borarice, fried Pithas. Tribals indulge in brewing rice bear. Indigenous games such as wrestling, racing, jumping, buffalo fighting, Egg fighting are the parts of the celebrations, Community fishing by the tribes in the large wetlands can be also seen. Earlier times martial games, like swordplay and javelin throwing were also customary.